Pollinator Garden Assistance and Recognition Program

Native Texas plants need native Texas pollinators to thrive.

be a pollinator champion logo

 

Texas Master Naturalist, Hill Country Chapter and the Native Plant Society of Texas Kerrville, Fredericksburg, and Boerne Chapters have partnered to promote small plot gardens to protect native pollinators and increase the use of native plants.

 

bee covered in pollenbee on purple flowerbee on primrose

The Pollinator Garden Assistance and Recognition Program is a joint project with a network of Texas Master Naturalist and Native Plant Society (NPSOT) volunteers who educate local homeowners, groups, institutions, and organizations about the importance of native plants and habitat in our unique Hill Country environment.

butterfly on four nerve daisybutterfly on brown eyed susan

 

 

 

 

 

We help plan native pollinator gardens – our advice is a free service.

The program’s volunteers advise gardeners who wish to plant pollinator gardens which provide nectar and habitat for native pollinators: bees, butterflies, moths, beetles, and hummingbirds.

We discuss garden plans, recommend plants that will grow best on the site, provide advice and encouragement, and recognize and reward gardeners’ important contributions to pollinator conservation.

The Pollinator Garden Assistance and Recognition Program’s Pollinator Champion Team presents certificates of recognition to pollinator gardeners during Hill Country Chapter and NPSOT meetings.

 

“It’s easy to plant a pollinator garden anywhere – at home, school, business, or church – and it doesn’t have to be a large garden. A chain of little gardens throughout the area will provide food and habitat for native pollinators.” Pam Lienhard, project coordinator

 

world of color posterA world of pollinators working 24/7. Artwork © Paul Mirocha [/caption]

 

PGARP Mission statementWhy: Loss of habitat and overuse of pesticides are detrimental to the nectar plants used by pollinators essential to our food sources and the beauty of the Texas Hill Country.

Who: The program is open to folks with existing gardens as well as those establishing new gardens.

Where: Texas Master Naturalist, Hill Country Chapter’s ten-county region: Bandera, Edwards, Gillespie, Kendall, Kerr, Kimble, Mason, Menard, Real, and San Saba counties.

 

bee on cornflower

 

Monarch butterfly side view iconRequest a Pollinator Garden Consultation or Garden Recognition
Request a volunteer consultation for help planning a pollinator garden or apply for Pollinator Champion garden recognition.

 

bee with pollen sacs
Pollinator Champion Criteria
Pollinator gardens must meet minimum and select requirements to qualify for recognition.

 

echinaceaPlant List PDF Excel
The Texas Hill Country is home to many native plants that bloom at various times of the year and support native pollinators.

 

Plant Suppliers PDF Excel
Area nurseries offer native plants and seeds. Local organizations also hold seasonal native plant sales.

 

Pollinator Resources
Literature and websites are great resources for planning pollinator gardens.

 

We love to talk pollinators and native plants. Give us a buzz at PollinatorChampion@gmail.com

 

 

Pollinator Garden yard sign

Pollinator gardeners who receive recognition from the Pollinator Garden Assistance and Recognition Program may purchase the program’s garden sign.

 

 

Gallery images courtesy of Richard Coleman, Mary Frushour, Arlon Motsch, Clarence Reed, and other Hill Country Chapter members.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pollinator Champion Criteria

Pollinator Champion garden requirements:

Minimum Requirements for new gardens (must meet all):

  • Minimum of approximately 100 square feet total planting area, no larger than 5500 square feet (1/8 acre).
  • Minimum of approximately 100 square feet total planting area or larger for existing gardens.
  • Flowering plants available to pollinators at least nine months of the year.
  • No invasive plants in pollinator garden.
  • Selective use of pesticides, herbicides, or insecticides in or around the pollinator garden to minimize environmental impact.
  • Plant mix of no less than 75% native and no more than 25% non-native plants.

Additional Requirements (meet at least five):

Suitable Pollinator Habitat
  • Bare ground area with no mulch or stone for native bees
  • Crevices in walls
  • Dry plant stems
  • Low hanging limbs for resting spot
  • Native bee houses
  • Rock piles
  • Snags
  • Stacked logs
  • Un-mown area for overwintering pollinators
Supplemental Food and Water
  • Birdbath
  • Fountain
  • Hummingbird feeders
  • Pollinator puddles
  • Small stream
Other considerations and recommendations:
  • Contact 811 before digging to verify location of underground utilities.
  • Deer proofing measures
  • Wire fencing to exclude small animals.
  • Verify planting plans with Home Owners Association if necessary.
  • Talk to your friends and neighbors about your pollinator gardens.

 

Request a Pollinator Garden Consultation or Garden Recognition

Request a Pollinator Garden Consultation or Garden Recognition

Request a volunteer consultation for help planning a pollinator garden or apply for "Pollinator Champion" garden recognition. We can discuss garden plans, provide advice, and recommend plants. Qualifying gardens receive the "Pollinator Champion" pollinator garden recognition certificate from Texas Master Naturalist, Hill Country Chapter or area Native Plant Society of Texas chapters.
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The Pollinator Garden Recognition and Assistance Program (PGARP) is responsible for content on this page.

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