LMN Newsletter

The Lindheimer Quarterly – Summer 2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Lindheimer Quarterly – 1st Quarter 2019

 

 

 

 

 

Winter Newsletter 2018

Fall 2018 Newsletter


 

 

 

 

Summer 2018 Newsletter


 

 

 

 

Spring 2018 Newsletter


 

 

 

 

Winter 2017 Newsletter

Snow on trees in Central Texas


 

 

 

 

Fall 2017 Newsletter
Lindheimer Chapter Newsletter--July, Aug, Sept


 

 

 

Summer 2017 Newsletter


 

 

 

2017 Spring Newsletter

 

 

 

 


 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

March 16th Meeting:  Ferdinand J. Lindheimer

Join us as we learn about the Father of Texas Botany, Ferdinand Jacob Lindheimer (1801-1879). Texas Master Naturalist, Susan James, will discuss the importance of F.J. Lindheimer both as a botanist and naturalist to Texas.

Texas AgriLife Extension Service- Comal County
325 Resource Dr, New Braunfels, TX
Thursday, March 16th
6:00 Social, 6:30 Presentation


2016 LMN Party

More than 55 Master Naturalists, guests and Naturalist Trainees enjoyed delicious food, a gift game, fun and conviviality at the Annual LMN Christmas Party held at the Tye Preston Memorial Library in December.

New officers were elected. Joel Dunnington will be President of Lindheimer Master Naturalists in 2017. Vice President is Arthur Williams, Treasurer is Rich Nielson and Secretary is Kim Wright.

Many thanks to all members and guests who made contributions of homemade foods and treats. Thanks also to retiring Hospitality Chair, Glenna Dunnington and to Santa’s Helpers, Glenna, Marilyn Garrison, Midge Baugh, Salty Brady and Janet Moody.


2017 LMN Officers Elected


officers-graphic


Nov 17th Meeting:  Winter Sparrows

tp-inglet-birding

 

Patsy and Tom Inglet are coming to help us learn to find and recognize sparrow species that winter in Central Texas.   Bring your sparrow birding questions.  Public welcome.  

 

Tye Preston Memorial Library
16311 South Access Road, Canyon Lake, TX
Nov 17th, 2016
6:00 Social, 6:30 Presentation, 7:30 Business


2016 Lindheimer Master Naturalist Graduation
Texas Horned Lizards’ Success!

Education Committee Co-Chairs Val Lefebvre and Darlene Varga along with LMN President Jim Teeling present Certificates and Pins to 2016 Grads.

Education Committee Co-Chairs Val Lefebvre and Darlene Varga along with LMN President Jim Teeling present Certificates and Pins to 2016 Grads.

Two conference rooms at Tye Preston Memorial Library were filled with proud family, friends and Chapter Members for the October 20th Graduation Celebration of the 2016 Lindheimer Master Naturalist Class.

Avery Pepitone congratulates Grandfather Don Epps on his Certification as Master Naturalist.

Avery Pepitone congratulates Grandfather Don Epps on his Certification as Master Naturalist.

Following a rigorous year-long program of classroom training, field research and completion of required volunteer service hours, 25 individuals received the Dragonfly pin that is the symbol of Texas Master Naturalists.

 

 

Class of 2016 "Texas Horned Lizards" Presented Education Chairs Val Lefebvre and Darlene Varga with Figurines and Gift Certificates in appreciation for their service.

Class of 2016 presented Education Chairs Val Lefebvre and Darlene Varga with Figurines and Gift Certificates in appreciation for their service.

Val Lefebvre and Darlene Varga, Education Committee Co-Chairs, did a masterful job of coordinating each training session, arranging for speakers, field research planning, trouble-shooting and personal mentoring of each candidate for certification. They also worked tirelessly ‘behind the scenes’, being at each location where candidates were to gather and staying afterward to secure the location. Ms. Lefebvre said that the year “provided lots of fun memories and many memorable moments.” The Class extends its sincere thanks to these competent leaders for making the entire certification process possible and such a positive experience….Full Story & More Photos



LMN Class of 2016 at Agrilife Classroom last year
LMN Class of 2016 Graduation Oct. 20th, 6:00 pm

Congratulations!!!


 Sept. 15th Meeting:  Hill Country Water 101

Water pooling between limestone cliffs with trees  Charlie Flatten, Water Policy Program Manager at Hill Country Alliance, will discuss Texas Hill Country groundwater science and policy, water basics, and surface-to-groundwater connections.  He will also introduce the Hill Country Alliance.  Public welcome.  

                                                                                  Tye Preston Memorial Library
16311 South Access Road, Canyon Lake, TX
Sept 15th, 2016
6:00 Social, 6:30 Presentation, 7:30 Business


All You Ever Wanted to Know About Fireflies

Ben beginning his "Fireflies of Texas" presentaion

Ben Pfeiffer beginning his “Fireflies of Texas” presentation.

Ben Pfeiffer discussed the types of fireflies (Lampyridae) in Texas, why they flash and how they use light to communicate with potential mates at the August 18 meeting of Lindheimer Master Naturalists. He showed how to identify Texas species and discussed their distribution across the State.

Ben also gave pointers on how to create a good habitat for fireflies in your own backyard. He addressed specific threats to fireflies and discussed why they are disappearing in many areas of Texas.

Firefly.org, a firefly conservation and educational non-profit organization, was founded by Ben. He became interested in preserving fireflies in 2009 after learning that fireflies are becoming more and more scarce in the United States. He created the website to educate the population in an effort to preserve their habitat and to stop their rapid decrease in numbers. Since then, Firefly.org has grown in popularity and is currently the internet’s most visited site about fireflies.

Those species of fireflies found in Texas are the central focus of Ben’s work. He is seeking to understand Lampyridae distribution across the state and threats to their habitat and survival, as well as educating people in ways to protect fireflies in their area.

Ben studied biology at Texas State University and is currently involved in completing the Texas Master Naturalist Certification course of study. He is a native Texan and lifelong resident of the state. He has spent most of his life working to understand Texas’ ecology and unique diversity.

How you can help preserve and protect fireflies:

  • Buy land to serve as a habitat for fireflies.
  • Avoid the use of broad spectrum pesticides, especially lawn chemicals (If you have snails and similar pests, you provide food for firefly larvae.)
  • Turn off exterior lights (light pollution is one of the major causes of firefly decline).
  • Let log and leaf litter accumulate.
  • Plant trees and native grasses.
  • Don’t over-mow your lawn.
  • Start a pollinator or a vegetable garden.

 


Dr. Gary Lofgren: Planetary Geology and Lunar Rocks


astronaut-on-moon

For those of you who’ve wondered what the ‘dark’ side of the moon looks like, how earth rocks are different from moon rocks or if earth time would change forever without the moon – these questions and many more were answered when Doctor Gary Lofgren, retired NASA Geologist, Trainer of Astronauts and Curator of the Lunar Sample Laboratory at the Johnson Space Center spoke at the July 21st meeting of the Lindheimer Master Naturalists.

Dr. LofgrenMoon says that he didn’t always know he would grow up to be a geologist, but a lifelong interest in geology began when he was a child, picking up interesting rocks and later collecting and studying rock specimens. When he and his family moved from Minnesota to California, he saw geologic features across the “Badlands” of South Dakota through Yellowstone National Park to the Pacific coast area that cemented his interest in geology. A report he wrote about the Russian ‘Sputnik’ satellite in high school was his first extraterrestrial research project and possible precursor for his distinguished career with NASA and the space program.

Astronauts training for lunar rock collection

Astronauts training for lunar rock collection

He received a scholarship to undergraduate school at Stanford University. Dr. Lofgren says that sitting in the auditorium with other freshmen, he was called upon to declare a major – “that I could always change it. I wrote ‘Geology’ in the box.” He went on tocomplete that BA degree in Geology; then a Master’s degree in Geology from Dartmouth University; and a Ph.D. also in Geology from Stanford in 1968.

His professional career in the geology of other interplanetary bodies began when he was recruited by NASA in 1968…Full Article

Sample of basaltic lava from the moon

Lunar basaltic lava sample

 

Interested to know more about the moon and lunar geology?  Look at Dr. Lofgren’s Lunar Observations.

 

 


Bat Conservation International Receives Lindheimer Master Naturalist Award

Fran Hutchins, Director of Bracken Cave Preserve, receives the 2015 Community Naturalist award from LMN President Jim Teeling.

Fran Hutchins, Director of Bracken Cave Preserve, receives the 2015 Community Naturalist award from LMN President Jim Teeling.

The Lindheimer Master Naturalists presented the Community Naturalist Award for 2015 to Fran Hutchins, Director of the Bracken Cave Preserve of Bat Conservation International, at their February 18th meeting, held at Tye Preston Memorial Library.

The Bracken Bat Cave, along with its approximately 20 million Mexican Free Tail Bats, has been in existence for thousands of years and is currently the home of the largest colony of bats in the world. The cave and the surrounding area are also a significant bat fly zone, golden cheeked warbler nesting spot and a natural landscape for protecting the Edwards Aquifer.

As urban sprawl began threatening the cave and its inhabitants, Bat Conservation International began purchasing the cave foot print and surrounding property. In 2012 after a proposal for a subdivision was presented that would cover 1500 acres on the flight path of the bats, BCI initiated the “Save the Bracken Cave Preserve” campaign. BCI was joined by the Texas chapter of The Nature Conservancy (TNC) and Mrs. Laura Bush’s “Taking Care of Texas” group. With the support of local communities, federal and local government, and a global petition signed by 20,000 people, BCI and TNC purchased 1521 acres of land surrounding the cave. The two organizations now own 3,500 acres from Cibolo Creek to the Natural Bridge Caverns property.

BCI’s mission for the area was ultimately met. The Bracken Bat Cave and surrounding land was protected for generations to come. The impact on environmental stewardship, the ecological significance and long term benefits for Comal County and the entire area are enormous.

 


Feathered Friends – GRSP Nature Explorers

Ranger Craig Hensley explains the process of banding and release to children at GRSP.

Ranger Craig Hensley explains the process of banding and release to children at GRSP.

More than 3 dozen children ages 5 to 10 enjoyed ‘nose to beak’ experiences as Lindheimer Master Naturalists joined Texas Parks and Wildlife to introduce them to the world of birds at the Guadalupe River State Park January 22nd.

The homeschoolers and sponsors were divided into three groups to participate in different experiences with birds, including a Bird Walk, Bird Identification, Bird Artifacts and the Bird Banding and Release process.

Nyta Brown, Park Administrator of Old Tunnel State Park, shows preserved specimens of native birds.

Nyta Brown, Park Administrator of Old Tunnel State Park, shows preserved specimens of native birds.

While LMN volunteers Val Lefebvre, Darlene Varga, Kathy Bliss, Coco Brennan, Carol Wilson and Sara Riggs led a Bird Walk and conducted demonstrations in the Discovery Center, Ranger Craig Hensley demonstrated banding and release in the outdoor amphitheater. Ranger Laura Horner and Old Tunnel Park Administrator Nyta Brown also led the children in activities with native birds.

The Nature Explorers Program is an on-going monthly series during which children interact with volunteers and TPW personnel as they are immersed in the various aspects of nature in Guadalupe State Park and Honey Creek.

Darlene Varga demonstrates the wingspan of a California Condor.

Darlene Varga demonstrates the wingspan of a California Condor.

 


Bird in the Hand

Ranger Craig Hensley and LMN volunteers were busy again Saturday morning, January 23rd when more children and parents visited Guadalupe River State Park for another engaging, hands-on experience with native songbirds. “Bird in the Hand” is an ongoing program for children to learn about science and bird-banding and how they and their families can help.

Bird in Hand 2016.01.23      Bird in Hand2 2016.01.23

 


Lindheimer Master Naturalists Honored

Pictured here left to right: Val Lefebvre, Carol Wilson, Sara Riggs, Darlene Varga, Ranger Craig Hensley, Kathy Bliss, Coco Brennan

Pictured here left to right: Val Lefebvre, Sara Riggs, Carol Wilson, Darlene Varga, Ranger Craig Hensley, Kathy Bliss, Coco Brennan

Lindheimer Master Naturalists were honored Friday, January 22 with the Guadalupe River State Part Volunteer Award in appreciation to service to the community through volunteer activities at the park and ongoing contributions to the education and conservation programs of Texas Parks and Wildlife.

 


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